Don’t get SAD

BY: Laura Pinzón | Neighbors’ Consejo|

The change of season brings with it the yearning for new plans. However, seasons like winter also bring mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and stress. This is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

Many people who suffer from it do not even know they have it. However, it is important to bear in mind that there are warning signs to detect it, such as wanting to sleep excessively or having problems falling asleep, being constantly angry, not wanting to share with loved ones and even becoming completely isolated from activities held during the holiday season and winter months[1] .

The figures presented by the web portal MedlinePlus show how common SAD is – “…occurs in 0.5 to 3 percent of individuals in the general population; it affects 10 to 20 percent of people with major depressive disorder and about 25 percent of people with bipolar disorder[2] .” On the other hand, according to The American Psychiatric Association: “About 5 percent of adults in the U.S. experience SAD and it typically lasts about 40 percent of the year. It is more common among women than men[3] .”

There are solutions for everything, and here are some tips that are recommended to face SAD: Find activities that help you enjoy time with yourself, like listening to music or reading, practice wellness and reflection, give support to others, and if you consider that feeling better is still very difficult, ask for help[4] .

References

 [1]https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/seasonal-affective-disorder/#causes

 [2]https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/seasonal-affective-disorder/#causes

 [3]https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/depression/seasonal-affective-disorder

 [4]https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/external/2020/12/tackle-the-winter-blues-with-mental-health-first-aid/#:~:text=Seasonal%20affective%20disorder%20(SAD)%20is,low%20energy%2C%20and%20difficulty%20concentrating.

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